The Pura Vida Experience

**While I work out upcoming possibilities, I have more time (and WiFi!) to work on my Patreon page, which I invite you to visit and join as a Patron for as little as $3 (or as much as you care to put forth in support of my work!) per video creation. My videos delve into the vast biodiversity of the tropical nature of Costa Rica. Thanks for reading & please do check out my Patreon!** 

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So with my unreal and dreamlike experience of an internship with Saladero at an end, I’m now based in Puerto Jimenez which is set nearly upon the tip of Costa Rica’s Osa Peninsula. The peninsula boasts 2.5% of the biodiversity of the entire world, and being that it is only a tiny fragment of land in comparison to all the landmass of the planet, this makes it one of the most complex biological systems in the world, condensed into a mere 700 square miles.

The Osa Peninsula was originally an island, evolving species of birds and animals separate from mainland Costa Rica, just like Darwin’s finches on the isolated Galapagos islands. Along Costa Rica’s south Pacific coast, a geological uplift occurred 2 million years ago creating the land bridge that now connects the Osa to mainland Costa Rica, creating within its embrace the rich Golfo Dulce, also teaming with life.

With the landbridge connection, some of the species that evolved apart from those on the mainland are found nowhere else in the world, they are thus endemic (found solely in a set location) to the Osa Peninsula. Other species unique to the Osa, those of which had greater mobility, migrated to the mainland and some individuals found appropriate habitat to be able to exist there as well. An example is the critically endangered Mangrove Hummingbird, which now can also be found in mangrove ecosystems along Pacific Costa Rica.

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It’s beautiful here in Jimenez, looking out across the sparkling blue Golfo Dulce with brilliant red, yellow and blue Scarlet Macaws flying over and toucans calling from the trees. As the high season comes to a close and invierno (winter, aka rainy/green season) approaches, I’m here looking toward the next page of this whirlwind life. It’s such an experience, living and working here in Costa Rica, the Ticos (Costa Ricans) are very kind and I’m constantly able to work on my Spanish with a great deal of Tico patience and understanding.

While I work out upcoming possibilities, I have more time (and WiFi!) to work on my Patreon page, which I invite you to visit and  become a patron for as little as $3 (or as much as you care to put forth in support of my work!) per video creation. My videos delve into the vast diversity of the tropical nature and vast biodiversity of Costa Rica. Feel free to check out the page!

About Stacey M. Hollis

Living at the edge of southern Costa Rica's rich Golfo Dulce working with non-profit Osa Birds: Research and Conservation. With a background in environmental journalism, avian field biology, bird guiding and ecotourism, my aim is to share my passion for birds and spread the word about the importance of wildlife conservation.
This entry was posted in Costa Rica, Pura Vida, Indeed, Uncategorized, video and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to The Pura Vida Experience

  1. Pingback: Heading North! | feathersawry

  2. gareth.twickenham@gmail.com says:

    Hi Stacey, Very good to read your latest post. Hope all goes well as you shape your next steps after the wonderful experience of Saladero. We have been enjoying reading your excellent blogs. I have one question. Do you have the contact details for Andy ( of Osa Conservation). He was keen to get in touch with people at Kew Gardens in London. I think we can help – but have lost his contact details! Thanks for letting us know. We all have wonderful memories of our time in Costa Rica in January, and Saladero was definitely the highlight of a very special trip. Thanks again and best wishes

    Gareth Sent from my iPhone

    >

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